Police Refusing To Investigate Multiple Brexit Criminalities


Months after Scotland Yard received ‘substantial’ evidence of potential criminality by Brexit groups, nothing has happened.

Now openDemocracy ask in a new report ...

"Is the police probe destined for the political long-grass?"

Despite being handed their first dossier of evidence of potential crimes committed by pro-Leave groups over five months ago, no progress has been made nor a formal case opened into the activities of either Vote Leave, fronted by Boris Johnson and Michael Gove, or Leave.EU, the pro-Brexit campaign bankrolled by Arron Banks.

Earlier this year, the UK Electoral Commission reported that multiple breaches of electoral law, false declarations and covert campaign over-spending had taken place by pro-Leave groups during the 2016 EU referendum. Substantial fines were levied, and the Electoral Commission’s reports and all related evidence were shared with Scotland Yard and the National Crime Agency.


The Met revealed it has yet to start any formal investigation, and has remained effectively stalled for months in “assessing evidence”. Pushed on why there has been no progress, or no formal case logged, a Scotland Yard spokesman admitted there ...
... were issues and 'political sensitivities' that had to be taken into account.
Jolyon Maugham QC, the barrister who leads the anti-Brexit Good Law Project, told openDemocracy that it was ...
... profoundly troubling that the Met was delaying or even not opening its investigation into the Electoral Commission’s evidence.
If the MPS are delaying an investigation into a likely crime because of political interference then ‘scandal’ does not begin to cover it. Were that true, we would be living in a police state where criminality was overlooked - if that criminality was expedient to the government.


Labour’s deputy leader, Tom Watson, said that breaking law during “one of the most critical moments in the UK’s history” made it of “urgent national interest that the police investigate what happened, how it happened and who was responsible.”

Watson added ...
It is disappointing that no progress appears to have been made into these investigations months after they were supposed to start.
In the wake of the Electoral Commission reports, a group of 70 cross-party MPs, peers and MEPs, wrote to Cressida Dick, the Met commissioner, and to the Director General of the National Crime Agency, Lynne Owens. The letter stated that the Electoral Commission had limited powers of investigation and sanctions, and had no powers to prosecute. It urged the Met and the NCA to “investigate these matters thoroughly and with urgency.”


A senior Home Office source, close to the Home Secretary Sajid Javid, told openDemocracy ...
We move on ... maybe there are other issues that deserve our national attention more.

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